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  • >The 50 words are: a, am, and, anywhere, are, be, boat, box, car, could, dark, do, eat, eggs, fox, goat, good, green, ham, here, house, I, if, in, let, like, may, me, mouse, not, on, or, rain, Sam, say, see, so, thank, that, the, them, there, they, train, tree, try, will, with, would, you.

    I wonder if the publisher selected the words beforehand, or if Geisel was simply limited to 50 words and he picked them. Also, this:

    >By 2001, it had become the fourth-best selling English-language children’s hardcover book of all time.

    Pretty good for just 50 words. Also:

    >In 1965, the book was banned in the People’s Republic of China for its “portrayal of early Marxism”. The ban was lifted in 1991, following Seuss’ death.

    I guess they did not like Green Eggs and Ham.

  • Ted Cruz talked about it and read the book into the Senate record during his more than 17-hour speech on the Senate floor against Obamacare in 2013. A number of famous chefs have been inspired to create recipes for green eggs and ham, including Martha Stewart, Rachael Ray and Paula Deen. When Martin Luther nailed his protest up to the church door in 1517, he may not have realized the full significance of what he was doing, but four hundred years later, thanks to him, my dear, I can wear whatever I want on my John Thomas. And Protestantism doesn’t stop at the simple condom. Oh, no! I can wear French Ticklers if I want.

  • Loses 50$, sells 8 million plus books

  • The publisher was a Gamblin’ Man

  • Hm, thought it was because of the drugs

  • Publisher played Mr. Geisel like a violin…

  • That’s awesome! My favorite book ever

  • We know

  • And he wrote The Cat in the Hat three years earlier, also with reduced vocabulary but not quite as tight as the later 3E&H, as a primer to fight against the dullness of the Dick and Jane books. He even said, “It is the book I’m proudest of because it had something to do with the death of the Dick and Jane primers.”

  • Oh, word?

  • He was also an alcoholic and didn’t particularly care for children.

  • I’ve never understood why Dr Suess is so beloved and some kind of staple for children’s books. It’s all nonsense!

  • This gets posted every couple of weeks

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