35 Comments

  • It’s most likely vastly higher than that due to illegal fishing and failure to report actual catches by china. Remember they were caught and admitted to over fishing their quotas by 8x for decades.

  • And then there is this.

    http://www.ghostfishing.org

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  • I used to work for an american catching/processing company and I gotta say they were really good about their fishing practices. We used every bit of the fish (alaskan pollock). We used the roe, the milt, fillet them, took the fish oil, and ground down the rest for fishmeal. Very very very little went to waste. We had specific quotas and even had a U.S. gov observer on board at all times to make sure we were to quota.

  • Zeller D, Cashion T, Palomares M, Pauly D. Global marine fisheries discards: A synthesis of reconstructed data. Fish Fish. 2017;00:1–10. https://doi.org/10.1111/faf.12233

  • That’s 20 BILLION pounds, and that’s all we know for certain about. Wow. There are so many uses for our planet’s resources. Omega 3, dog food, regular human consumption.

    There’s just so many ways we don’t need to waste this resource, what a shame.

  • A lot of the times these numbers seem huge but are actually very small compared to the world they reside in. But ten million tonnes is more than a kilo per person alive. Or ten kilos to every child in poverty. That’s insane.

  • 37% of the seafood caught globally feeds livestock like cows, pigs, farmed fish, and chicken. What a weird world.

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  • we kill so many fish every year it’s insane. I can’t believe there are still fish in the ocean

  • How do they even calculate these numbers? Couldn’t it be much more? (Serious)

  • I fish for sport, trout specifically. I’m lucky to live in a part of NY state where trout are stocked frequently. There’s plenty to go around, almost every time I go (probably two times a week) I catch my limit of three trout, and they’re often large fish. The other day the DEC (department of environmental conservation) caught people with 50+ trout in the trunk of their car. Beyond the fine they face which will certainly be expensive, I’m offended by the fact that those fishermen are taking an opportunity from someone else. Respecting the ecological limits put in place by any governing body ensures that fish will be there for future generations.

  • Zeller says a big issue is high-pricing where a fisherman throws out the smaller or lesser fish in favor of the larger. If high-pricing is an issue for the 9.17% waste (10/109 is 9.17, not “almost 10”), how do we fix that? When someone’s livelihood is based in payment per pound, they’re of course always going to catch more than they need and will gladly throw out the smaller fish in favor of the larger one.

    Options are what? Pay better wages? Average wage of a fisherman is 27K a year plus usually bonuses for amount of fish processed or if contracts are finished. You could outlaw the weight/catch incentives, but that would only lead to a shortage of ships and crew which would then drive prices up because very few are going to risk their life for only $27K/year.

    Poor fishing practices and management are also a targeted issue. If there’s another way to fish that can meet demands the way current methods do, even if it’s close to those numbers, we need those methods in public. Farm raised everything isn’t going to work when there’s an enormous market that’s adamantly against it.

    We don’t need finger pointing and shaming, we need solutions.

  • This is something the Navy should be taking care of.

  • Salmon being “too small” is a new one for me. Were they not targeting returning adults? Perhaps all the small ones were pinks?

  • As someone who works in this industry, a large part of the problem too is food service suppliers requesting a lot more than they can readily sell. They will forecast large amounts which causes us to increase the amounts we fish for. More often than not they will not go through all of it and either we get stuck with a lot of fish in a cold storage or they hold onto the fish and don’t want to admit they screwed up. If it’s not someone overfishing it’s corporate greed and one’s reach exceeding their grasp.

  • Forget r/badscience, this is r/sadscience

  • This is an unpopular opinion, but I think that 100% of fish pulled out of their habitat are wasted.

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  • The wasted products generated in North America could definitely feed/fuel some smaller economies.

    I worked at a place where we would throw away perfectly good brand new in the packaged goods straight from a truck into a trash bin because “it was bought and paid for and if it doesn’t get used we won’t receive the same budget next year” and box after box, thousands of dollars of goods perfectly useable goods went directly into the trash just so said company could receive the same amount of spending cash.

  • I need those fish to use as fertilizer in my garden. They should not be so wasteful.

  • I worked as a sport-fishing guide in the Miami area for years.

    Since I was old enough to fish, I did it for sustenance. Never for a trophy, but alas, that is what the majority of people want. Trophies. Status symbols brought upon by a beautiful fish they took a few cranks of the reel with and pride themselves on the beast they “caught”.

    The utmost of disrespect towards the ocean, and obviously an incredibly poor fishing practice. Obviously industrial fishing has a much greater impact, but I’m in full support of trophy fishing being outlawed. It’s disgusting.

  • Discarded fish are consumed by other fish. Which starts the cycle again back to somthing we want to harvest.

  • This is one thing that needs to be regulated and managed internationally. Complete with severe penalties.

  • And yet they still pass off diarrhea fish as tuna. SMH

    http://www.motherjones.com/environment/2009/11/green-around-gills/

  • This makes me so very mad. I love eating seafood. I don’t because of all of the shortages. These bastards…

  • Is there anything the average person (unaffiliated with the fishing industry) can do to mitigate this?

  • Yep – over fishing almost extincted the cod fishery off Nova Scotia, thanks to huge trawlers hauling it in year after year. Don’t even bother talking to me about “Global warming” until you want to address the real issues: a) over-population and its corollaries: 2) animal husbandry 3) agriculture. Not to mention deforestation and the extinction of species. Making solar panels and growing grass on your roof trading “carbon” is pissing in the wind compared to those issues.

  • I wish they quoted in percentage of total fish caught instead. When titles contain raw numbers, you have no idea whether it is a lot or a little in comparison to the relevant scales, and your intuition might just be way off. *Seems* like a lot by order of magnitude…

  • This should be pinned to the front page. We all eat food – but we are rarely reminded where it comes from. Why is there not more focus on important issues like this? Instead of the Paris climate accord, we should have the “You’re killing all of the fish in the Sea. No Joke, literally. Eat sustainably.” accord.

  • This makes me unbelievably angry.

  • >Fishers discard a portion of their catch because fishing practices damage the fish and make them unmarketable,

    *Unmarketable?*

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