Holography-based 3D printing produces objects in seconds instead of hours. Three beams of light carefully patterned to only intersect with each other produce a constructive interference in the exact points that need to solidify. Once that pattern is set, it only takes seconds to solidify the resin


Holography-based 3D printing produces objects in seconds instead of hours. Three beams of light carefully patterned to only intersect with each other produce a constructive interference in the exact points that need to solidify. Once that pattern is set, it only takes seconds to solidify the resin



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14 Comments

  • The post title is incorrect. There’s no intentional constructive wave interference, just the addition of intesnsity from three beams and the use of a resin system with a threshold behavior, where it only cures above a certain light dose. In fact the only wave interference mentioned in the article is a defect: laser speckle causes build artifacts and the authors anticipate that incoherent light may work better.

    Really neat though! The resin system sounds like it’s basically identical with normal stereolithography resins, the O2 cure inhibition mechanism is well known and has been used before. This is an extremely practical sounding avenue to pursue.

    I especially liked the suggestion to use (paraphrasing) “a more complex pattern made by serial exposure of simpler beam geometries”. You could imagine a simple low-NA beam from a normal projector style micro-mirror DLP array being directed onto a container from a spinning mirror system and working to cure the resin sort of like a light lathe.

  • Great, but is the resin under the same patent protection other photoresin-based printing are currently stuck under?

  • I only glanced at the abstract but with typical SLA systems defraction of the laser light plays a major role in the curing depth. I dont see this exisisting in anything other than a micro scale any time soon. It sounds a lot like 2 photon stereolithography

    Edit: it’s only theoretical at this stage “The results indicate that low-absorbing resins containing ~0.1% photoinitiator, illuminated at modest powers (~10 to 100 mW), may be successfully used to build full structures in ~1 to 10 s.”

    It would be really nice if it could work but having worked in 3d printing for over 5 years i have very little hope for SLA tecnology ever being usefull for anything other than a shortlived prototype

  • So when can i get one?

  • The problem is that resin tends to be really expensive.

    We need to find ways to get that cost down significantly.

  • I already thought this was how they did it.

    Seems like I’ve let another patent slip through my fingers!

  • This is now a mall kiosk in Miracle Mile on S. Las Vegas Blvd. You stand inside and a 3d resin statue of you is printed in S, M or L.

  • I always thought radiation treatment should be done this way, or maybe it is. Three or more low intensity beams aimed at the tumor that all intersect at the specific point of the tumor and deal a much more-deadly blow to the tumor.

  • I read the image as “Science Avocados” at first.

  • Why does that skeleton look like George Costanza

  • Not one Symmetra reference in this entire thread.

  • So is this like the laser 3d printing that was done in [Darkman](https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darkman)? I was 9 when it came out in ’90 but I thought the idea seemed genius and plausible enough that almost 30 years later I (think I) still remember how it worked.

  • Lol old news.

    You can build your own with an hd projector.

    Ted talk search 3d printing 100x fastwr

  • This already exists as a company.

    https://www.carbon3d.com/

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