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  • Journal reference 1:

    Replication Study: Inhibition of BET recruitment to chromatin as an effective treatment for MLL-fusion leukaemia

    Xiaochuan Shan Juan Jose Fung Alan Kosaka Gwenn Danet-Desnoyers

    Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology

    eLife 2017;6:e25306

    DOI: 10.7554/eLife.25306

    Link: https://elifesciences.org/articles/25306

    Abstract:

    > In 2015, as part of the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology, we published a Registered Report (Fung et al., 2015), that described how we intended to replicate selected experiments from the paper “Inhibition of BET recruitment to chromatin as an effective treatment for MLL-fusion leukaemia” (Dawson et al., 2011). Here, we report the results of those experiments. We found treatment of MLL-fusion leukaemia cells (MV4;11 cell line) with the BET bromodomain inhibitor I-BET151 resulted in selective growth inhibition, whereas treatment of leukaemia cells harboring a different oncogenic driver (K-562 cell line) did not result in selective growth inhibition; this is similar to the findings reported in the original study (Figure 2A and Supplementary Figure 11A,B; Dawson et al., 2011). Further, I-BET151 resulted in a statistically significant decrease in BCL2 expression in MV4;11 cells, but not in K-562 cells; again this is similar to the findings reported in the original study (Figure 3D; Dawson et al., 2011). We did not find a statistically significant difference in survival when testing I-BET151 efficacy in a disseminated xenograft MLL mouse model, whereas the original study reported increased survival in I-BET151 treated mice compared to vehicle control (Figure 4B,D; Dawson et al., 2011). Differences between the original study and this replication attempt, such as different conditioning regimens and I-BET151 doses, are factors that might have influenced the outcome. We also found I-BET151 treatment resulted in a lower median disease burden compared to vehicle control in all tissues analyzed, similar to the example reported in the original study (Supplementary Figure 16A; Dawson et al., 2011). Finally, we report meta-analyses for each result.

    Journal reference 2:

    Replication Study: The common feature of leukemia-associated IDH1 and IDH2 mutations is a neomorphic enzyme activity converting alpha-ketoglutarate to 2-hydroxyglutarate

    Megan Reed Showalter Jason Hatakeyama Tomas Cajka Kacey VanderVorst Kermit L Carraway III Oliver Fiehn

    eLife 2017;6:e26030

    DOI: 10.7554/eLife.26030

    Link: https://elifesciences.org/articles/26030

    Abstract:

    > In 2016, as part of the Reproducibility Project: Cancer Biology, we published a Registered Report (Fiehn et al., 2016), that described how we intended to replicate selected experiments from the paper “The common feature of leukemia-associated IDH1 and IDH2 mutations is a neomorphic enzyme activity converting alpha-ketoglutarate to 2-hydroxyglutarate” (Ward et al., 2010). Here, we report the results of those experiments. We found that cells expressing R172K mutant IDH2 did not display isocitrate-dependent NADPH production above vector control levels, in contrast to the increased production observed with wild-type IDH2. Conversely, expression of R172K mutant IDH2 resulted in increased alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent consumption of NADPH compared to wild-type IDH2 or vector control. These results are similar to those reported in the original study (Figure 2; Ward et al., 2010). Further, expression of R172K mutant IDH2 resulted in increased 2HG levels within cells compared to the background levels observed in wild-type IDH2 and vector control, similar to the original study (Figure 3D; Ward et al., 2010). In primary human AML samples, the 2HG levels observed in samples with mutant IDH1 or IDH2 status were higher than those observed in samples without an IDH mutation, similar to what was observed in the original study (Figure 5C; Ward et al., 2010). Finally, we report meta-analyses for each result.

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